Apr
26
2012

How to uncover the statistical truths about your inquiry emails

Ever wonder about your inquiry email response time? Are you getting back to guests quickly enough? Too slowly? Ever wonder what kinds of email you receive most often? Or when it arrives?

If you use Gmail to manage your inquiry emails, a new tool can help you gain some insights to these types of questions.

It’s called Gmail Meter and it can get to the bottom of how you communicate, statistically speaking.

What will Gmail Meter uncover? Here’s an overview:

  • Volume (number of emails send, received, how many conversations)
  • Graphs of daily, weekly and monthly traffic
  • Response times
  • lots more

There are several metrics which could give you actionable information.

To provide you examples for this article, I ran Gmail Meter on an inquiry email account I set up last fall.  Here are some of the analytics produced for this account:

 

 Optimized a 1 How to uncover the statistical truths about your inquiry emails

The graph above indicates that I respond to many inquiries during my lunch hour, near the end of the work day… and during the wee o’clock hours. Guest inquiries tend to arrive in the afternoon and late night hours (this reflects my eastern time zone, and of course, the guests are spread out over many time zones).

The takeaway here is that the graph seems to indicate that I am pretty good at responding shortly after inquiries arrive. If the graph had instead showed most inquiries arriving at noon, and I responded mostly at midnight, then this could indicate a “lag” problem. It’s always better to respond sooner rather than later.

 

 

Optimized a 2 How to uncover the statistical truths about your inquiry emails

The graph above indicates that the beginnings and endings of the month tend to generate more inquiries, and the middle of the month is relatively quiet. Who knew?

The takeaway here is now that I am armed with this knowledge, I can be more diligent about expecting inquiries, and pouncing on them, during certain weeks of the month.

 

 

Optimized a 3 How to uncover the statistical truths about your inquiry emails

 

The graph above indicates that weekdays tend to generate more inquiries than weekends, and that Tuesday is especially busy producing over 20% of the traffic. Again, who knew?

The takeaway here is now that I am armed with this knowledge, I can be more diligent about expecting inquiries on certain days of the week, and be ready to act accordingly. I can also take comfort in knowing that while I am golfing on the weekends, the odds are that I probably won’t be ignoring much inquiry traffic icon smile How to uncover the statistical truths about your inquiry emails

 

 

Optimized a 4 How to uncover the statistical truths about your inquiry emails

Remember the question I opened this article with? The question about inquiry response time? This graph is the lens by which we can begin to see the answer. The graph above indicates that about 60% of my responses generally happen in 4 hours or less. Not bad, but this metric is a means by which I can establish a baseline, and strive to get better (like eliminate that “More” column).

 

It’s very easy to set up Gmail Meter. Here is a video that walks you through the process:

 

 

My guess is that Google may someday integrate these types of features into Gmail without requiring us to install any scripts. But at least it’s very easy to install the add-on.

I hope you have enjoyed this “science of inquiry emails” topic.

I encourage you to use Gmail Meter and the thought process I outlined above for your inquiry management. If you do, come back here after you use if for a while and tell us in the comments whether you’re gaining insights, changing habits, and nailing more bookings as a result.

 

Do you think your vacation rental business might benefit from similar analytics features as they relate to data within your inquiries (let us know)? By the way… It’s coming, and we can’t wait to show you.

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Posted in: Analytics

About the Author: by

Curt Tudor is the founder of Rentallect, Inc. which produces software for Vacation Rental Marketing, Analytics, Inquiry Management and CRM. He is also an owner of a Vacation Rental Condo in Beaver Creek Colorado, as well as another overlooking Grand Father Mountain in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina

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